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Improvements in fuel cell designImprovements in fuel cell design

Rediscovering Venus to find faraway earths

Archaeologists discover bronze remains of Iron Age chariot

Researchers resolve the Karakoram glacier anomaly, a cold case of climate science

Fish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fishFish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fish

New 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiencyNew 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiency

Researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiberResearchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber

Magnetic mirrors enable new technologies by reflecting light in uncanny ways

Structure of an iron-transport protein revealedStructure of an iron-transport protein revealed

First step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagusFirst step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagus

Lift weights, improve your memory

Spiders: Survival of the fittest group

Autophagy helps fast track stem cell activationAutophagy helps fast track stem cell activation

Myelin vital for learning new practical skillsMyelin vital for learning new practical skills

More physical activity improved school performanceMore physical activity improved school performance

Around the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red foxAround the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red fox

Engineering new vehicle powertrainsEngineering new vehicle powertrains

Active aging is much more than exerciseActive aging is much more than exercise

Study: New device can slow, reverse heart failureStudy: New device can slow, reverse heart failure

Are the world's religions ready for ET?Are the world's religions ready for ET?

Recreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networksRecreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networks

Laying the groundwork for data-driven scienceLaying the groundwork for data-driven science

Hold on, tiger momHold on, tiger mom

Nature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologiesNature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologies

Missing piece found to help solve concussion puzzleMissing piece found to help solve concussion puzzle

Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'

Geography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economyGeography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economy

Identified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonationIdentified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonation

Copied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithmsCopied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithms

Body Weekly - October 2014 Archives


Antioxidant found in grapes uncorks new targets for acne treatment (10/31/2014)

Antioxidant found in grapes uncorks new targets for acne treatmentUCLA researchers have demonstrated how resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes and found in wine, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne. The team also found that combining resveratrol with a common acne medication, benzoyl peroxide, may enhance the drug's ability to kill the bacteria and could translate into new treatments. ...> Full Article


Reading a biological clock in the dark (10/31/2014)

Proper coordination between our gut bacteria and our biological clocks may be crucial for preventing obesity and glucose intolerance. ...> Full Article


Comprehensive study of allergic deaths in US finds medications are main culprit (10/30/2014)

Medications are the leading cause of allergy-related sudden deaths in the US, according to an analysis conducted by researchers at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine . The study, published online today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, also found that the risk of fatal drug-induced allergic reactions was particularly high among older people and African-Americans and that such deaths increased significantly in the US in recent years. ...> Full Article


New viral mutation made middle-aged adults more susceptible to last year's flu (10/30/2014)

New viral mutation made middle-aged adults more susceptible to last year's fluA team of scientists, led by researchers at The Wistar Institute, has identified a possible explanation for why middle-aged adults were hit especially hard by the H1N1 influenza virus during the 2013-2014 influenza season. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, offer evidence that a new mutation in H1N1 viruses potentially led to more disease in these individuals. ...> Full Article


Feeling fatigued while driving? Don't reach for your iPod (10/29/2014)

Research has shown that drinking caffeinated beverages and listening to music are two popular fatigue-fighting measures that drivers take, but very few studies have tested the usefulness of those measures. New research to be presented at the HFES 2014 Annual Meeting in Chicago evaluates which method, if either, can successfully combat driver fatigue. ...> Full Article


Study suggests altering gut bacteria might mitigate lupus (10/29/2014)

Lactobacillus species, commonly seen in yogurt cultures, correlate, in the guts of mouse models, with mitigation of lupus symptoms, while Lachnospiraceae, a type of Clostridia, correlate with worsening, according to research published ahead of print in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 'Our results suggest that the same investigation should be performed in human subjects with lupus,' says principal investigator Xin Luo of Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA. ...> Full Article


An apple a day could keep obesity away (10/28/2014)

An apple a day could keep obesity awayScientists at Washington State University have concluded that nondigestible compounds in apples -- specifically, Granny Smith apples -- may help prevent disorders associated with obesity. The study, thought to be the first to assess these compounds in apple cultivars grown in the Pacific Northwest, appears in October's print edition of the journal Food Chemistry. ...> Full Article


New way to detox? 'Gold of Pleasure' oilseed boosts liver detoxification enzymes (10/28/2014)

University of Illinois scientists have found compounds that boost liver detoxification enzymes nearly fivefold, and they've found them in a pretty unlikely place -- the crushed seeds left after oil extraction from an oilseed crop used in jet fuel. ...> Full Article


Researchers confirm the biochemical cause of seasonal depression (10/28/2014)

New research confirms why some people suffer from the winter blues while others get through the winter without any problems. ...> Full Article


Hand size appears to stay constant, providing natural 'ruler' (10/27/2014)

People tend to perceive their dominant hand as staying relatively the same size even when it's magnified, lending support to the idea that we use our hand as a constant perceptual 'ruler' to measure the world around us. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. ...> Full Article


Modified vitamin D shows promise as treatment for pancreatic cancer (10/26/2014)

Modified vitamin D shows promise as treatment for pancreatic cancerSalk scientists find that a vitamin D-derivative makes tumors vulnerable to chemotherapy. ...> Full Article


The ideal age of sexual partners is different for men and women (10/26/2014)

New evolutionary psychology research shows gender differences in age preferences regarding sexual partners. ...> Full Article


States need to assume greater role in regulating dietary supplements (10/25/2014)

States need to increase their regulation of dietary supplements used for weight loss and muscle building, which often do not deliver promised results, to protect consumers, particularly adolescents. ...> Full Article


Wavefront optics emerging as new tool for measuring and correcting vision, reports Optometry and Vision Science (10/24/2014)

A technique developed by astronomers seeking a clear view of distant objects in space is being intensively studied as a new approach to measuring and correcting visual abnormalities. The October issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry, is a theme issue devoted to research on wavefront refraction and correction. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. ...> Full Article


Note to young men: Fat doesn't pay (10/23/2014)

Men who are already obese as teenagers could grow up to earn up to 18 percent less than their peers of normal weight. So says Petter Lundborg of Lund University, Paul Nystedt of Jönköping University and Dan-olof Rooth of Linneas University and Lund University, all in Sweden. The team compared extensive information from Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States, and the results are published in Springer's journal Demography. ...> Full Article


Variability keeps the body in balance (10/22/2014)

Although the heart beats out a very familiar 'lub-dub' pattern that speeds up or slows down as our activity increases or decreases, the pattern itself isn't as regular as you might think. In fact, the amount of time between heartbeats can vary even at a 'constant' heart rate -- and that variability, doctors have found, is a good thing. ...> Full Article


Eating five a day may keep the blues away (10/22/2014)

Fruit and vegetable consumption could be as good for your mental as your physical health, new research suggests. ...> Full Article


Skin pigment renders sun's UV radiation harmless using projectiles (10/21/2014)

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden and other institutions have worked out how the pigment of the skin manages to protect the body from the sun's dangerous UV rays. The skin pigment converts the UV radiation into heat through a rapid chemical reaction that shoots protons from the molecules of the pigment. ...> Full Article


Protecting the body from itself (10/20/2014)

Protecting the body from itselfScientists from A*STAR's Bioprocessing Technology Institute have established a clearer relationship between two cells which serve our body's natural defense mechanisms against diseases and infections. Their findings, published in the prestigious journal Cell Reports, will help the medical community better understand autoimmunity and could pave the way for treatment of autoimmune diseases. ...> Full Article


Severe periodontitis: Sixth most prevalent health condition in the world (10/20/2014)

IADR/AADR have published a paper titled 'Global Burden of Periodontitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression.' The manuscript, by lead researcher Wagner Marcenes is published in the OnlineFirst portion of the IADR/AADR Journal of Dental Research. The study's findings underscore the enormous public health challenge posed by severe periodontitis and are a microcosm of the epidemiologic transition to non-communicable diseases occurring in many countries. ...> Full Article


Genetic switch regulates a plant's internal clock based on temperature (10/18/2014)

Genetic switch regulates a plant's internal clock based on temperatureScientists have found the molecular cog in a plant's biological clock that modulates its speed based on temperature. ...> Full Article


Dry roasting could help trigger peanut allergy (10/18/2014)

Dry roasted peanuts are more likely to trigger an allergy to peanuts than raw peanuts, suggests an Oxford University study involving mice. The researchers say that specific chemical changes caused by the high temperatures of the dry roasting process are recognized by the body's immune system, 'priming' the body to set off an allergic immune response the next time it sees any peanuts. ...> Full Article


Even without kids, couples eat frequent family meals (10/18/2014)

Couples and other adult family members living without minors in the house are just as likely as adults living with young children or adolescents to eat family meals at home on most days of the week, new research suggests. ...> Full Article


Spouse's personality influences career success, study finds (10/17/2014)

Spouse's personality influences career success, study findsAs much as we might try to leave personal lives at home, the personality traits of a spouse have a way of following us into the workplace, exerting a powerful influence on promotions, salaries, job satisfaction and other measures of professional success, new research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests. ...> Full Article


Human sense of fairness evolved to favor long-term cooperation (10/16/2014)

Human sense of fairness evolved to favor long-term cooperationThe human response to unfairness evolved in order to support long-term cooperation, according to a research team from Georgia State University and Emory University. ...> Full Article


How stress tears us apart (10/15/2014)

How stress tears us apartChronic stress can lead to behavioral problems. A team from the Brain Mind Institute has discovered an important synaptic mechanism: the activation of a cleaving enzyme, leading to these problems. ...> Full Article


Americans rate losing eyesight as having greatest impact on their lives (10/14/2014)

Many Americans across racial and ethnic groups describe losing eyesight as potentially having the greatest impact on their day-to-day life, more so than other conditions including: loss of limb, memory, hearing and speech (57 percent of African-Americans, 49 percent of non-Hispanic whites, 43 percent of Asians and 38 percent of Hispanics). ...> Full Article


Lack of facial expression leads to perceptions of unhappiness, new OSU research shows (10/14/2014)

People with facial paralysis are perceived as being less happy simply because they can't communicate in the universal language of facial expression, a new study from an Oregon State University psychology professor shows. ...> Full Article


Gut bacteria, artificial sweeteners and glucose intolerance (10/13/2014)

Gut bacteria, artificial sweeteners and glucose intoleranceWeizmann Institute research shows that artificial sweeteners promote glucose intolerance in a surprising way: by changing the composition and function of the gut microbiota. ...> Full Article


Do wearable lifestyle activity monitors really work? (10/12/2014)

Wearable electronic activity monitors hold great promise in helping people to reach their wellness goals. These increasingly sophisticated devices help the wearers improve their wellness by constantly monitoring their activities and bodily responses through companion computer programs and mobile apps. Given the large market for these devices, researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston analyzed 13 of these devices to compare how the devices and their apps work to motivate the wearer. ...> Full Article


Job stress not the only cause of burnouts at work (10/12/2014)

New research from Concordia University and the University of Montreal proves that having an understanding partner is just as important as having a supportive boss. ...> Full Article


More cheese, please! News study shows dairy is good for your metabolic health (10/11/2014)

Researchers from CHU de Québec Research Center and Laval University studied the dairy-eating habits of healthy French-Canadians' and monitored how dairy consumption may have an effect on their overall metabolic health. They published their findings today in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism. ...> Full Article


People are attracted to the body odor of others with similar political beliefs (10/10/2014)

A new study reveals that people find the smell of others with similar political opinions to be attractive, suggesting that one of the reasons why so many spouses share similar political views is because they were initially and subconsciously attracted to each other's body odor. ...> Full Article


Walking or cycling to work improves wellbeing, University of East Anglia researchers find (10/9/2014)

Walking or cycling to work is better for people's mental health than driving to work, according to new research by health economists at the University of East Anglia.A report published today reveals that people who stopped driving and started walking or cycling to work benefited from improved wellbeing. In particular, active commuters felt better able to concentrate and were less under strain than if they traveled by car. ...> Full Article


Study may shed light on molecular mechanisms of birth defects among older women (10/8/2014)

Dartmouth researchers studying cell division in fruit flies have discovered a pathway that may improve understanding of molecular mistakes that cause older women to have babies with Down syndrome. ...> Full Article


Dendritic cells affect onset and progress of psoriasis (10/8/2014)

Different types of dendritic cells in human skin have assorted functions in the early and more advanced stages of psoriasis report researchers in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. The scientists suggest that new strategies to regulate the composition of dendritic cells in psoriatic skin lesions might represent an approach for the future treatment of the disease. ...> Full Article


Study finds high protein diets lead to lower blood pressure (10/7/2014)

Adults who consume a high-protein diet may be at a lower risk for developing high blood pressure. The study, published in the American Journal of Hypertension, by researchers from Boston University School of Medicine, found participants consuming the highest amount of protein -- an average of 100 g protein/day -- had a 40 percent lower risk of having high blood pressure compared to the lowest intake level. ...> Full Article


Not enough vitamin B1 can cause brain damage (10/7/2014)

A deficiency of a single vitamin, B1 (thiamine), can cause a potentially fatal brain disorder called Wernicke encephalopathy. Symptoms can include confusion, hallucinations, coma, loss of muscle coordination and vision problems such as double vision and involuntary eye movements. Untreated, the condition can lead to irreversible brain damage and death. ...> Full Article


New superfoods could help key protein keep bodies healthy (10/6/2014)

New superfoods could help key protein keep bodies healthyA new generation of new superfoods that tackle heart disease and diabetes could be developed following research into a protein that helps keep cells in our bodies healthy. Researchers at the University of Warwick found that the protein, called Nrf2, continually moves in and out of the nuclei of human cells to sense the cell's health and vitality. The team from Warwick Medical School, successfully increased the speed of Nrf2's movement by artificially introducing health beneficial substances. ...> Full Article


Fish and fatty acid consumption associated with lower risk of hearing loss in women (10/5/2014)

Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital found that consumption of 2 or more servings of fish per week was associated with a lower risk of hearing loss in women. ...> Full Article


Chemists discover way nose perceives common class of odors (10/4/2014)

Chemists discover way nose perceives common class of odorsBiologists claim that humans can perceive and distinguish a trillion different odors, but little is known about the underlying chemical processes involved. Biochemists at the City College of New York have found an unexpected chemical strategy employed by the mammalian nose to detect chemicals known as aldehydes. ...> Full Article


Is spooning really the best position for men with back pain? (10/3/2014)

A study using motion capture technology provides new information on the spinal strain produced by various sexual positions -- suggesting that one position commonly recommended for all men with low back pain is not actually the best choice, reports a study in the journal Spine. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. ...> Full Article


An appetite for life (10/2/2014)

A simple question about appetite can provide insights into old people's general health that may help reduce their risk of dying.In a study published in the journal Appetite, emeritus professor Mark Wahlqvist from Monash University's Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine and the Monash Asia Institute, led a team investigating the connection between appetite and mortality. ...> Full Article


Back pain killing your sex life? (10/1/2014)

Back pain killing your sex life?Contrary to popular belief, spooning is not always the best sex position for those with a bad back, according to new research from the University of Waterloo. For the first time ever, scientists have successfully documented the way the spine moves during sex and discovered exactly why certain positions are better than others when it comes to avoiding back pain. ...> Full Article


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Vitamin supplement successfully prevents noise-induced hearing loss



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