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Improvements in fuel cell designImprovements in fuel cell design

Rediscovering Venus to find faraway earths

Archaeologists discover bronze remains of Iron Age chariot

Researchers resolve the Karakoram glacier anomaly, a cold case of climate science

Fish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fishFish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fish

New 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiencyNew 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiency

Researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiberResearchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber

Magnetic mirrors enable new technologies by reflecting light in uncanny ways

Structure of an iron-transport protein revealedStructure of an iron-transport protein revealed

First step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagusFirst step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagus

Lift weights, improve your memory

Spiders: Survival of the fittest group

Autophagy helps fast track stem cell activationAutophagy helps fast track stem cell activation

Myelin vital for learning new practical skillsMyelin vital for learning new practical skills

More physical activity improved school performanceMore physical activity improved school performance

Around the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red foxAround the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red fox

Engineering new vehicle powertrainsEngineering new vehicle powertrains

Active aging is much more than exerciseActive aging is much more than exercise

Study: New device can slow, reverse heart failureStudy: New device can slow, reverse heart failure

Are the world's religions ready for ET?Are the world's religions ready for ET?

Recreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networksRecreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networks

Laying the groundwork for data-driven scienceLaying the groundwork for data-driven science

Hold on, tiger momHold on, tiger mom

Nature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologiesNature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologies

Missing piece found to help solve concussion puzzleMissing piece found to help solve concussion puzzle

Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'

Geography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economyGeography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economy

Identified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonationIdentified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonation

Copied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithmsCopied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithms

Body Weekly - October 2013 Archives


Large study to examine if vitamin D prevents diabetes (10/31/2013)

Researchers have begun the first definitive, large-scale clinical trial to investigate if a vitamin D supplement helps prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in adults who have prediabetes, who are at high risk for developing type 2. Funded by the National Institutes of Health, the study is taking place at about 20 study sites across the United States. ...> Full Article


Light as medicine? (10/31/2013)

Light as medicine?Scientists have known for years that certain wavelengths of light in certain doses can heal, but they are only now uncovering exactly how it works, thanks in large part to research cluster in Milwaukee. ...> Full Article


Making sense of conflicting advice on calcium intake (10/30/2013)

In recent years, studies have reported inconsistent findings regarding whether calcium supplements used to prevent fractures increase the risk of heart attack. Now, in an assessment of the scientific literature, reported as a perspective piece in the Oct. 17, 2013 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, a UC San Francisco researcher says patients and health care practitioners should focus on getting calcium from the diet, rather than supplements, when possible. ...> Full Article


'Traffic-light' labeling increases attention to nutritional quality of food choices (10/30/2013)

'Traffic-light' labeling increases attention to nutritional quality of food choicesA simple, color-coded system for labeling food items in a hospital cafeteria appears to have increased customer's attention to the healthiness of their food choices, along with encouraging purchases of the most healthy items. ...> Full Article


The benefits of bacteria for gut health (10/29/2013)

Scientists from the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, United States have shown that specific gut bacteria are beneficial for maintaining a healthy intestine in the fruit fly Drosophila and mice and also contribute to the overall health of these organisms. The findings, which are published today in The EMBO Journal, could have implications for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease as well as allergic, metabolic and infectious disorders. ...> Full Article


Study strengthens link between low dietary fiber intake and increased cardiovascular risk (10/29/2013)

A new study published in the December issue of The American Journal of Medicine shows a significant association between low dietary fiber intake and cardiometabolic risks including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular inflammation, and obesity. Surveillance data from 23,168 subjects in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2010 was used to examine the role dietary fiber plays in heart health. ...> Full Article


Bird study finds key info about human speech-language development (10/28/2013)

A study led by Xiaoching Li, Ph.D., at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence, has shown for the first time how two tiny molecules regulate a gene implicated in speech and language impairments as well as autism disorders, and that social context of vocal behavior governs their function. ...> Full Article


The pig, the fish and the jellyfish: Tracing nervous disorders in humans (10/28/2013)

The pig, the jellyfish and the zebrafish have been used to gain a greater understanding of hereditary forms of diseases affecting the nervous system. In this project the focus was on a specific gene in pigs, SYN1, which encodes the protein synapsin, which is involved in communication between nerve cells. Synapsin almost exclusively occurs in nerve cells in the brain. Parts of the gene can thus be used to control an expression of genes connected to hereditary versions of the nerve disorders. ...> Full Article


The elephant in the room: Elephant vocal folds may hold clues to human sound production (10/27/2013)

Christian Herbst and his colleagues from the University of Vienna, Austria, have known for just little over a year that elephants produce sound in a similar way to humans, namely by the passive flow-induced vibration of the vocal folds. But just how similar are they to us? Herbst finds out that in many aspects they are different to us, but unusual properties of the vocal fold may in turn help us understand human sound production. ...> Full Article


Working to the beat (10/27/2013)

Working to the beatMaking music alleviates physical exertion. ...> Full Article


Adding citrus fiber to meatballs improves nutritional quality, does not affect taste (10/26/2013)

Adding citrus fiber to meatballs improves nutritional quality,  does not affect tasteA research team at the University of Missouri is addressing the US fiber deficit by including citrus fiber in ground beef while retaining the quality and taste of the meat. ...> Full Article


Scientists unravel mechanisms in chronic itching (10/26/2013)

Scientists unravel mechanisms in chronic itchingNew research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that chronic itching, which can occur in many medical conditions, is different from the urge to scratch a mosquito bite. Chronic itching appears to incorporate more than just the nerve cells that normally transmit itch signals. In chronic itching, neurons that send itch signals also co-opt pain neurons to intensify the itch sensation. ...> Full Article


Studies show how critical sleep is to maintaining a healthy lifestyle (10/25/2013)

Three new studies show just how critical it is for adults to seek treatment for a sleep illness and aim for seven to nine hours of sleep each night in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. ...> Full Article


12 percent of midlife women say they are satisfied with their body size (10/25/2013)

12 percent of midlife women say they are satisfied with their body sizeA new study of women ages 50 and older examines the 12.2 percent who say they are satisfied with their body size to unlock the secrets of body satisfaction. This minority of midlife women who report being satisfied with their body size appears to exert considerable effort to achieve and maintain this satisfaction. In addition, they are not impervious to dissatisfaction with other aspects of their physical appearance; especially those aspects affected by aging. ...> Full Article


When it comes to the good cholesterol, fitness trumps weight (10/24/2013)

New findings suggest that maintaining a "healthy" weight isn't as important for healthy cholesterol function as being active by regularly performing strength training. This study is published in the Journal of Applied Physiology. ...> Full Article


Sleeping in on the weekends doesn't fix all the deficits caused by workweek sleep loss (10/24/2013)

A new study assesses the effects of extended "weekend" recovery sleep following "one workweek" of mild sleep restriction on sleepiness/alertness, inflammation and stress hormones. This article is published in the American Journal of Physiology ? Endocrinology and Metabolism. ...> Full Article


First-ever study reveals smell of sweat may alter how women are judged (10/23/2013)

Today, a new study from P&G Beauty, the makers of SecretTM deodorants, and lead investigator Pamela Dalton, Ph.D., M.P.H., member of the Monell Chemical Senses Center, confirms for the first time that the smell of stress sweat does, in fact, significantly alter how women are perceived by both males and females. Results of the study, published on Oct. 9, 2013, in PLOS ONE, indicate that the odor from stress-related sweat specifically impacts social judgments of one's confidence, trustworthiness and competence. ...> Full Article


40 years of federal nutrition research fatally flawed (10/23/2013)

Four decades of nutrition research funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention may be invalid because the method used to collect the data was seriously flawed, according to a new study by the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. ...> Full Article


Eat more, weigh less: Worm study provides clues to better fat-loss therapies for humans (10/22/2013)

Eat more, weigh less: Worm study provides clues to better fat-loss therapies for humansScientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered key details of a brain-to-body signaling circuit that enables roundworms to lose weight independently of food intake. The weight-loss circuit is activated by combined signals from the worm versions of the neurotransmitters serotonin and adrenaline, and there are reasons to suspect that it exists in a similar form in humans and other mammals. ...> Full Article


Baylor College of Medicine researchers find community-based weight loss intervention yields greater weight loss than self-help approach (10/22/2013)

Baylor College of Medicine researchers find community-based weight loss intervention yields greater weight loss than self-help approachA new randomized controlled trial conducted by Baylor College of Medicine researchers and published today as an article in press in the American Journal of Medicine finds that overweight and obese adults following a community-based weight loss intervention, namely Weight Watchers, lost significantly more weight than those who tried to lose weight on their own (10.1 lbs. vs. 1.3 lbs. at six months). ...> Full Article


Kissing helps us find the right partner -- and keep them (10/21/2013)

What's in a kiss? A study by Oxford University researchers suggests kissing helps us size up potential partners and, once in a relationship, may be a way of getting a partner to stick around. ...> Full Article


Healthier diets possible in low-income, rural communities in America (10/21/2013)

A team of investigators implemented a two-year intervention study in low-income, rural areas where a disproportionately higher risk of overweight and obesity habits among children persists, leading to increased risk of diabetes and heart disease in adulthood. The children enrolled in the study consumed significantly more fruits and vegetables. The results are published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. ...> Full Article


A silent epidemic: Minor traumatic brain injury (10/21/2013)

In the United States, approximately 1.4 million people suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year. Of those injuries, three out of four are minor TBI (mTBI) -- a head injury that causes a temporary change in mental status including confusion, an altered level of consciousness, or perceptual or behavioral impairments. ...> Full Article


Neurological researchers find fat may be linked to memory loss (10/20/2013)

Although there are several risk factors of dementia, abnormal fat metabolism has been known to pose a risk for memory and learning. People with high amounts of abdominal fat in their middle age are 3.6 times as likely to develop memory loss and dementia later in their life. ...> Full Article


Where does dizziness come from? (10/20/2013)

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have pinpointed a site in a highly developed area of the human brain that plays an important role in the subconscious recognition of which way is straight up and which way is down. ...> Full Article


Evaluating mobile weight loss apps on use of evidence-based behavioral strategies (10/19/2013)

In a new study published by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, UMass Medical School behavioral psychologist and weight loss expert Sherry Pagoto, Ph.D., and colleagues find that mobile apps to help people lose weight are lacking when it comes to strategies for changing behaviors. ...> Full Article


Study shows snacking on almonds decreased appetite without increasing body weight (10/18/2013)

A new study published in the Oct. issue of the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that study participants eating 1.5 ounces of dry-roasted, lightly salted almonds every day experienced reduced hunger and improved dietary vitamin E and monounsaturated ("good") fat intake without increasing body weight. ...> Full Article


Air pollution increases heart attacks (10/18/2013)

Air pollution increases heart attacksAir pollution increases heart attacks, according to research presented at the Acute Cardiac Care Congress 2013 by Dr. Savina Nodari from Brescia, Italy. The Acute Cardiac Care Congress 2013 is the annual meeting of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association of the European Society of Cardiology. It takes place Oct. 12-14 in Madrid, Spain. ...> Full Article


Eating disorders often associated with reproductive health problems (10/18/2013)

Women with eating disorders are less likely to have children than others in the same age group, indicates a study conducted at the University of Helsinki, Finland. The likelihood for miscarriage was more than triple for binge-eating disorder sufferers and the likelihood of abortion more than double for bulimics than others in the same age group. ...> Full Article


Food addiction a step closer to formal diagnostic status -- or not? (10/17/2013)

Excessive overeating as seen in some obese individuals reflects addictive-like behavior, raising the question of whether the condition should be formally entered into future editions of the DSM as a diagnosis. ...> Full Article


How binge drinking impairs bone healing (10/16/2013)

Physicians have long observed that binge drinking impairs healing of broken bones. A new study is providing insights into how alcohol slows healing on the cellular and molecular levels. The findings could lead to better treatments to improve bone healing. ...> Full Article


Massive DNA study points to new heart drug targets and a key role for triglycerides (10/16/2013)

A global hunt for genes that influence heart disease risk has uncovered 157 changes in human DNA that alter the levels of cholesterol and other blood fats -- a discovery that could lead to new medications. Each of the changes points to genes that can modify levels of cholesterol and other blood fats and are potential drug targets. Many of the changes point to genes not previously linked to blood fats, also called lipids. ...> Full Article


Running a marathon can be bad for the heart, especially in less prepared runners, say experts (10/16/2013)

Investigators who studied a group of recreational marathon runners have established that strenuous exercise such as running a marathon can damage the heart muscle. Although they found the effect is temporary and reversible, they warn that these effects are more widespread in less fit distance runners and that recreational distance runners should prepare properly before marathons. Their findings are published in the Oct. issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. ...> Full Article


Researcher finds a new role for the benefits of oxygen (10/15/2013)

During a heart attack when the flow of oxygen-rich blood to a section of the heart is interrupted, and not quickly restored, heart muscle begins dying. Deprived of oxygen and other essential nutrients, cell death continues possibly leading to progressive loss of heart function and congestive heart failure. Dartmouth researchers found that dying heart cells still contain enough oxygen for metabolism, and additional short-term spikes of oxygen keep the cells alive and active. ...> Full Article


Understanding the evolution of lungs through physical principles (10/15/2013)

Two French physicists, Bernard Sapoval and Marcel Filoche from École Polytechnique in Palaiseau, France, suggest in a study published in EPJ E how evolution has shaped our lungs through successive optimizations of physical parameters such as conservation of energy and speed of delivery. ...> Full Article


Nothin' to sneeze at (10/14/2013)

Researchers have successfully tested treatments for people with allergies to grasses and to dust mites. The treatments are from a new class of therapy, known as 'synthetic peptide immuno-regulatory epitopes', or SPIREs. Positive results, first with a cat allergy therapy and now with house dust mite and grass allergy treatments, suggest that this approach may be used for many common allergies. ...> Full Article


Scientists shed light on body's master energy regulator (10/13/2013)

Scientists shed light on body's master energy regulatorScientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have discovered some key features that explain just what turns on a protein that is considered to be a master regulator of how the human body uses and stores energy. ...> Full Article


What makes us left or right handed? New study rules out strong genetic factors (10/12/2013)

Around 10 percent of the UK is left handed -- and that percentage remains consistent in many populations around the world. But why exactly someone is left or right handed remains unclear. New research from The University of Nottingham's Professor John Armour and Dr Angus Davison, in collaboration with UCL's Professor Chris McManus, has ruled out a 'strong genetic determinant' in influencing handedness. ...> Full Article


Body image impacts on weight gain during pregnancy (10/11/2013)

How women perceive their bodies during pregnancy and how that impacts on their weight gain has been the subject of a new study by University of Adelaide researchers. ...> Full Article


Gathering information about food is not top priority for individuals with high metabolisms (10/11/2013)

New research has revealed that individuals with the highest metabolic rates within populations should be the least pre-occupied with keeping track of changes in their environments that could lead them to sources of food. Individuals with slower or average metabolisms however should be constantly monitoring their opportunities for higher gain when they are looking for food. The study shows that variation in metabolic rates between individuals can explain dramatic differences in information use when it comes to food. ...> Full Article


Fertility problems? Joining the 'breakfast club' can help (10/10/2013)

Fertility problems?  Joining the 'breakfast club' can helpA new study by researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Tel Aviv University reveals that eating a good breakfast can have a positive impact on women with problems of infertility. ...> Full Article


The phytonutrients in oats and their role in human health: A review of the evidence (10/10/2013)

Oats may deserve the well-earned status of "super grain", according to research presented at the American Association of Cereal Chemists International annual meeting, being held this week in Albuquerque, NM. World-renowned grain researchers presented compelling data to support the important role that oats can play in improving diet quality and supporting human health. ...> Full Article


Making eye contact doesn't always help your cause (10/9/2013)

New research shows that making eye contact, long considered an effective way of bringing someone to your point of view, may actually make people more resistant to persuasion, especially when they already disagree. ...> Full Article


Skin receptors convey sensation of texture through vibrations (10/9/2013)

Skin receptors convey sensation of texture through vibrationsNew research shows that humans distinguish the difference between fine textures, such as silk or satin, through vibrations, which are picked up by two separate sets of nerve receptors in the skin and relayed to the brain. ...> Full Article


Folic acid deficiency can affect the health of great, great grandchildren (10/8/2013)

A study out today reveals that a mutation in a gene necessary for the metabolism of folic acid not only impacts the immediate offspring but can also have detrimental health effects on the next several generations. ...> Full Article


Key cellular mechanism in the body's 'battery' can either spur or stop obesity (10/8/2013)

Key cellular mechanism in the body's 'battery' can either spur or stop obesityBecoming obese or remaining lean can depend on the dynamics of the mitochondria, the body's energy-producing "battery," according to two new studies by Yale School of Medicine researchers featured as the cover story in the Sept. 26 issue of the journal Cell. ...> Full Article


Latest research suggests moderate coffee consumption is not associated with increased CVD risk (10/7/2013)

The Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee, highlights latest research on coffee and cardiovascular health to mark World Heart Day. ...> Full Article


Over the limit (10/7/2013)

Over the limitPouring a glass of wine is rarely an exact measurement, especially in a social setting. While most people think of a glass as one serving, in reality it could be closer to two or three. Just how much one pours is influenced by a variety of environmental factors, researchers at Iowa State and Cornell universities discovered, and that could have serious consequences when it comes to overconsumption. ...> Full Article


How the gut got its villi (10/6/2013)

How the gut got its villiThe principles guiding the growth of intestinal structures called villi are surprisingly similar across chickens, frogs, mice, and snakes. The wrinkling of the inner gut, the researchers found, is intimately linked to the stages of muscle layer differentiation, which produce a series of different physical stresses. ...> Full Article


Living better with heart failure by changing what you eat (10/6/2013)

Just 21 days of following a low-sodium DASH diet lowered blood pressure and improved heart function for older adults living with a common type of heart failure. ...> Full Article


Study finds link between commonly prescribed statin and memory impairment (10/5/2013)

New research that looked at whether two commonly prescribed statin medicines, used to lower low-density lipoprotein or 'bad cholesterol' levels in the blood, can adversely affect cognitive function has found that one of the drugs tested caused memory impairment in rats. ...> Full Article


Do elite 'power sport' athletes have a genetic advantage? (10/4/2013)

A specific gene variant is more frequent among elite athletes in power sports, reports a study in the Oct. issue of The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, official research journal of the National Strength and Conditioning Association. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. ...> Full Article


Genetic makeup and diet interact with the microbiome to impact health (10/3/2013)

A Mayo Clinic researcher has shown that an individual's genomic makeup and diet interact to determine which microbes exist and how they act in the host intestine. The study was modeled in germ-free knockout mice to mimic a genetic condition that affects 1 in 5 humans and increases the risk for digestive diseases. ...> Full Article


Targeting memory T-cells in Type 1 diabetes (10/2/2013)

Encouraging results from the T1DAL study (Targeting effector memory T cells with alefacept in new onset type 1 diabetes) are published today in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. The T1DAL trial was designed to test whether alefacept would preserve pancreatic beta cell function in newly diagnosed patients. Secondary endpoints including insulin use and rate of hypoglycemic events were lower at 12 months in the alefacept treated group. ...> Full Article


Stronger sexual impulses may explain why men cheat more than women, study reveals (10/1/2013)

A recently published study strongly suggests men succumb to sexual temptations more than women -- for example, cheating on a partner -- because they experience strong sexual impulses, not because they have weak self-control. ...> Full Article


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