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Improvements in fuel cell designImprovements in fuel cell design

Rediscovering Venus to find faraway earths

Archaeologists discover bronze remains of Iron Age chariot

Researchers resolve the Karakoram glacier anomaly, a cold case of climate science

Fish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fishFish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fish

New 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiencyNew 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiency

Researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiberResearchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber

Magnetic mirrors enable new technologies by reflecting light in uncanny ways

Structure of an iron-transport protein revealedStructure of an iron-transport protein revealed

First step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagusFirst step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagus

Lift weights, improve your memory

Spiders: Survival of the fittest group

Autophagy helps fast track stem cell activationAutophagy helps fast track stem cell activation

Myelin vital for learning new practical skillsMyelin vital for learning new practical skills

More physical activity improved school performanceMore physical activity improved school performance

Around the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red foxAround the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red fox

Engineering new vehicle powertrainsEngineering new vehicle powertrains

Active aging is much more than exerciseActive aging is much more than exercise

Study: New device can slow, reverse heart failureStudy: New device can slow, reverse heart failure

Are the world's religions ready for ET?Are the world's religions ready for ET?

Recreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networksRecreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networks

Laying the groundwork for data-driven scienceLaying the groundwork for data-driven science

Hold on, tiger momHold on, tiger mom

Nature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologiesNature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologies

Missing piece found to help solve concussion puzzleMissing piece found to help solve concussion puzzle

Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'

Geography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economyGeography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economy

Identified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonationIdentified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonation

Copied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithmsCopied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithms

Body Weekly - May 2011 Archives


Virtual workout partners spur better results (5/31/2011)

Virtual workout partners spur better resultsCan't find anyone to exercise with? Don't despair: New research from Michigan State University reveals working out with a virtual partner improves motivation during exercise. The study led by Deborah Feltz, chairperson of MSU's Department of Kinesiology, is the first to investigate the Kohler effect on motivation in health video games; that phenomenon explains why inferior team members perform better in a group than they would by themselves. ...> Full Article


Dairy consumption does not elevate heart-attack risk, study suggests (5/30/2011)

Analysis of dairy intake and heart attack risk found no statistically significant relation in thousands of Costa Rican adults. Dairy foods might not harm heart health, despite saturated fat content, because they contain other possibly protective nutrients, researchers say. ...> Full Article


Why caffeine can reduce fertility in women (5/30/2011)

Caffeine reduces muscle activity in the Fallopian tubes that carry eggs from a woman's ovaries to her womb. "Our experiments were conducted in mice, but this finding goes a long way towards explaining why drinking caffeinated drinks can reduce a woman's chance of becoming pregnant," says Professor Sean Ward from the University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, Nev. ...> Full Article


Hormone level predicts end of fertility (5/29/2011)

The age-specific blood levels of the Anti-Müllerian hormone can predict when women will reach menopause. This makes family planning easier, say fertility researchers from the University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands. Their findings were published online May 26 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. ...> Full Article


No pain, big gain (5/29/2011)

In a longitudinal study published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience, a group of pain researchers from McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre posed a fundamental question: if you can alleviate chronic low back pain, can you reverse these changes in the brain? The answer is, yes. ...> Full Article


That anxiety may be in your gut, not in your head (5/28/2011)

Working with healthy adult mice, McMaster researchers showed that disrupting the normal bacterial content of the gut with antibiotics produced changes in behavior. ...> Full Article


Herbal remedies offer hope as the new antibiotics (5/27/2011)

Cancer treatments often have the side effect of impairing the patient's immune system. This can result in life-threatening secondary infections from bacteria and fungi, especially since bacteria, like Staphylococcus aureus, are becoming multi-drug resistant. New research published by BioMed Central's open-access journal Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials investigates the potency of Indian wild plants against bacterial and fungal infections in the mouths of oral cancer patients. ...> Full Article


Hormone improves long-term recovery from stroke (5/27/2011)

Scientists at the Sahlgrenska Academy have discovered an explanation of how stroke patients can achieve better recovery. A hormone that is associated with the growth hormone system has proved to benefit recovery during the later phases of rehabilitation after a stroke. ...> Full Article


Cell phone use may reduce male fertility (5/26/2011)

Men who have been diagnosed with poor sperm quality and who are trying to have children should limit their cell phone use. Researchers have found that while cell phone use appears to increase the level of testosterone circulating in the body, it may also lead to low sperm quality and a decrease in fertility. ...> Full Article


Digital imaging software to create a 'Google Earth' view of the bladder (5/26/2011)

Digital imaging software to create a 'Google Earth' view of the bladderA more automated approach to bladder exams could be cheaper, more comfortable and more convenient. The system would use the UW's ultrathin laser endoscope, which is like a thin piece of cooked spaghetti, in combination with software that automatically creates a 3-D panorama of the bladder interior. ...> Full Article


Study: Memory problems often not present in middle-aged people with Alzheimer's disease (5/25/2011)

A new study suggests more than half of people who develop Alzheimer's disease before the age of 60 are initially misdiagnosed as having other kinds of brain disease when they do not have memory problems. The research is published in the May 17, 2011, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. ...> Full Article


Gene variation linked to infertility in women, study finds (5/24/2011)

A variation in a gene involved in regulating cholesterol in the bloodstream also appears to affect progesterone production in women, making it a likely culprit in a substantial number of cases of their infertility, a new study from Johns Hopkins researchers suggests. ...> Full Article


Diet high in vegetables and fruit associated with less weight gain in African-American women (5/24/2011)

Investigators from the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University have reported that African-American women who consumed a diet high in vegetables and fruit gained less weight over a 14-year period than those who consumed a diet high in red meat and fried foods. ...> Full Article


Vitamins may hitch a protected ride on corn starch (5/23/2011)

Vitamins and medications may one day take rides on starch compounds creating stable vitamin-enriched ingredients and cheaper controlled-release drugs, according to Penn State food scientists. ...> Full Article


Coffee reduces breast cancer risk (5/22/2011)

Recently published research shows that coffee drinkers enjoy not only the taste of their coffee but also a reduced risk of cancer with their cuppa. More detailed research published today in BioMed Central's open access journal Breast Cancer Research shows that drinking coffee specifically reduces the risk of antiestrogen-resistant estrogen-receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer. ...> Full Article


Taking additional selenium will not reduce cancer risk (5/21/2011)

Although some people believe that taking selenium can reduce a person's risk of cancer, a Cochrane Systematic Review of randomized controlled clinical trials found no protective effect against non-melanoma skin cancer or prostate cancer. In addition, there is some indication that taking selenium over a long period of time could have toxic effects. ...> Full Article


Getting along with co-workers may prolong life, researchers find (5/20/2011)

People who have a good peer support system at work may live longer than people who don't have such a support system, according research published by the American Psychological Association. ...> Full Article


Standing up to fight (5/20/2011)

Standing up to fightA University of Utah study shows that men hit harder when they stand on two legs than when they are on all fours, and when hitting downward rather than upward, giving tall, upright males a fighting advantage. This may help explain why our ape-like human ancestors began walking upright and why women tend to prefer tall men. ...> Full Article


1 in 7 strokes occurs during sleep, many go without clot-busting treatment (5/19/2011)

Approximately 14 percent of all strokes occur during sleep, preventing many from getting clot-busting treatment, according to a study published in the May 10, 2011, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. ...> Full Article


Psychological factors influence gastrointestinal illness and minimal exercise prevents colon cancer (5/18/2011)

Research being presented at Digestive Disease Week shows that psychological issues may play a role in the severity of gastrointestinal symptoms. Another study found that just an hour a week of low-intensity exercise decreases the risk for colon polyps, particularly among overweight and obese individuals. DDW is the largest international gathering of physicians and researchers in the field of gastroenterology, hepatology, endoscopy and gastrointestinal surgery. ...> Full Article


Parsley, celery carry crucial component for fight against breast cancer, researcher finds (5/17/2011)

Parsley, celery carry crucial component for fight against breast cancer, researcher findsIn a new study, a University of Missouri researcher has found that a compound in parsley and other plant products, including fruits and nuts, can stop certain breast cancer tumor cells from multiplying and growing. ...> Full Article


Sugar boosters could lead to cheap, effective treatments for chronic bacterial infections (5/17/2011)

The Boston University researchers discovered that a simple compound -- sugar -- dramatically boosts the effectiveness of first-line antibiotics. Their findings appear in the May 12 issue of Nature. ...> Full Article


Damaged hearts pump better when fueled with fats (5/16/2011)

Contrary to what we've been told, eliminating or severely limiting fats from the diet may not be beneficial to cardiac function in patients suffering from heart failure, a study at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine reports. ...> Full Article


Night owls at risk for weight gain and bad diet (5/15/2011)

Staying up late every night and sleeping in is a habit that could put you at risk for gaining weight. People who go to bed late and sleep late eat more calories in the evening, more fast food, fewer fruits and vegetables and weigh more than people who go to sleep earlier and wake up earlier, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. They also had a higher body mass index, a measure of body weight, than normal sleepers. ...> Full Article


Exercise protects the heart via nitric oxide (5/14/2011)

Exercise both reduces the risk of a heart attack and protects the heart from injury if a heart attack does occur. For years, doctors have been trying to dissect how this second benefit of exercise works, with the aim of finding ways to protect the heart after a heart attack. Researchers have identified the ability of the heart to produce and store nitric oxide as an important way in which exercise protects the heart from injury. ...> Full Article


A comforting swan song (5/14/2011)

A comforting swan songSandi Curtis, a music therapy professor in the Concordia University Department of Creative Arts Therapies, has published a new study on the benefits of music therapy in the journal Music and Medicine. Her findings are based on a unique collaboration she orchestrated between university music therapy students, musicians from a professional symphony orchestra and a hospital palliative care ward. ...> Full Article


The body's power stations can affect aging (5/13/2011)

The body's power stations can affect agingMitochondria are the body's energy producers, the power stations inside our cells. Researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have now identified a group of mitochondrial proteins, the absence of which allows other protein groups to stabilize the genome. This could delay the onset of age-related diseases and increase lifespan. ...> Full Article


Pistachios pummel pretzels as a weight-wise snack (5/13/2011)

Pistachios pummel pretzels as a weight-wise snackWhen it comes to healthy snacking and weight management, a new study bolsters the long-held view that not all calories are created equal. According to nutrition researchers at UCLA, choosing to snack on pistachios rather than pretzels as part of a healthy diet not only supports your body mass index goals, but can support heart health too. ...> Full Article


Why the eye is better than a camera at capturing contrast and faint detail simultaneously (5/12/2011)

Why the eye is better than a camera at capturing contrast and faint detail simultaneouslyThe discovery nearly 50 years ago of lateral inhibition -- that the cones in the eye inhibit their neighbors by way of negative feedback -- explained the keen edge detail we see, but never accounted for the fact that we can see faint detail near these edges and in the shadows. UC Berkeley neurobiologists have discovered positive feedback among the cones that completes the picture. ...> Full Article


HIV drug could prevent cervical cancer (5/11/2011)

A widely used HIV drug could be used to prevent cervical cancer caused by infection with the human papillomavirus, say scientists. ...> Full Article


'Bad' cholesterol not as bad as people think (5/9/2011)

The so-called "bad cholesterol" -- low-density lipoprotein commonly called LDL -- may not be so bad after all, shows a Texas A&M University study that casts new light on the cholesterol debate, particularly among adults who exercise. ...> Full Article


Washing with contaminated soap increases bacteria on hands (5/9/2011)

Washing with contaminated soap increases bacteria on handsPeople who wash their hands with contaminated soap from bulk-soap-refillable dispensers can increase the number of disease-causing microbes on their hands and may play a role in transmission of bacteria in public settings according to research published in the May issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. ...> Full Article


Chemical found in crude oil linked to congenital heart disease (5/8/2011)

While it may be years before the health effects of the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico are known, a new study shows that fetal exposure to a chemical found in crude oil is associated with an increased risk of congenital heart disease. ...> Full Article


Fish livers contain beneficial fatty acids (5/7/2011)

Fish livers contain beneficial fatty acidsThe fishing industry usually discards fish livers, but a team of researchers from the University of Almeria has confirmed that they are a good source of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are beneficial to health. Anchovies are one of the fish whose livers contain the highest levels of these substances. ...> Full Article


Before you start bone-building meds, try dietary calcium and supplements (5/7/2011)

Has a bone density scan placed you at risk for osteoporosis, leading your doctor to prescribe a widely advertised bone-building medication? Not so fast! A University of Illinois study finds that an effective first course of action is increasing dietary calcium and vitamin D or taking calcium and vitamin D supplements. ...> Full Article


Pain and itch connected down deep (5/6/2011)

Pain and itch connected down deepDespite much research on pain receptors, investigators have only recently focused on itch and how the body distinguishes between itch and pain. This research, including new findings by UC Berkeley's Diana Bautista, show that the receptors responding to irritants actually work by triggering pain receptors, which in turn send signals to the brain that make us want to scratch. The connection suggests that new pain relievers under development may also help relieve intractable itch. ...> Full Article


Cotton swabs prove problematic for ear health (5/6/2011)

A study by Henry Ford Hospital shows a direct association between cotton swab use and ruptured eardrum. The study also shows that in most cases the rupture heals on its own and surgery is only necessary for the most severe cases. ...> Full Article


Natural protection against radiation (5/6/2011)

In the midst of ongoing concerns about radiation exposure from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan, scientists are reporting that a substance similar to resveratrol -- an antioxidant found in red wine, grapes and nuts -- could protect against radiation sickness. The report appears in ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters. ...> Full Article


Study: Antibiotics, not surgery, may better treat appendicitis if appendix hasn't burst (5/5/2011)

Antibiotics, not surgery, may better treat childhood appendicitis when the appendix hasn't burst, according to research by Southern Methodist University and University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, both in Dallas. Findings suggest that nonperforating appendicitis, when the appendix hasn't burst, and nonperforating diverticulitis, which is treated with antibiotics, could be different manifestations of the same underlying process. If so, the authors say, antibiotic therapy may be the best treatment for nonperforating antibiotics. ...> Full Article


Melatonin might help in controlling weight gain and preventing heart diseases associated with obesity (5/4/2011)

Melatonin is a natural hormone produced by the body that can also be found in some fruits and vegetables as mustard, Goji berries, almonds, sunflower seeds, cardamom, fennel, coriander and cherries. University of Granada researchers have analyzed the effects of melatonin on obesity, dyslipidimia and high blood pressure in young diabetic obese rats. ...> Full Article


Americans still may not be getting enough calcium (5/3/2011)

Americans may not be getting enough calcium in their diets, according to a new study published in the May 2011 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association. This study is unique among those focusing on calcium intake in the US population because both dietary and supplemental sources were evaluated across adult age groups and compared to accompanying patterns in energy intake. ...> Full Article


Tropical blueberries are extreme super fruits (5/2/2011)

The first analysis of the healthful antioxidant content of blueberries that grow wild in Mexico, Central and South America concludes that some of these fruits have even more healthful antioxidants than the blueberries -- already renowned as "super fruits" -- sold throughout the United States. These extreme super fruits could provide even more protection against heart disease, cancer and other conditions, the report suggests. It appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. ...> Full Article


Increased metabolic rate may lead to accelerated aging (5/1/2011)

A recent study accepted for publication in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism found that higher metabolic rates predict early natural mortality, indicating that higher energy turnover may accelerate aging in humans. ...> Full Article


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