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Improvements in fuel cell designImprovements in fuel cell design

Rediscovering Venus to find faraway earths

Archaeologists discover bronze remains of Iron Age chariot

Researchers resolve the Karakoram glacier anomaly, a cold case of climate science

Fish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fishFish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fish

New 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiencyNew 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiency

Researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiberResearchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber

Magnetic mirrors enable new technologies by reflecting light in uncanny ways

Structure of an iron-transport protein revealedStructure of an iron-transport protein revealed

First step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagusFirst step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagus

Lift weights, improve your memory

Spiders: Survival of the fittest group

Autophagy helps fast track stem cell activationAutophagy helps fast track stem cell activation

Myelin vital for learning new practical skillsMyelin vital for learning new practical skills

More physical activity improved school performanceMore physical activity improved school performance

Around the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red foxAround the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red fox

Engineering new vehicle powertrainsEngineering new vehicle powertrains

Active aging is much more than exerciseActive aging is much more than exercise

Study: New device can slow, reverse heart failureStudy: New device can slow, reverse heart failure

Are the world's religions ready for ET?Are the world's religions ready for ET?

Recreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networksRecreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networks

Laying the groundwork for data-driven scienceLaying the groundwork for data-driven science

Hold on, tiger momHold on, tiger mom

Nature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologiesNature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologies

Missing piece found to help solve concussion puzzleMissing piece found to help solve concussion puzzle

Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'

Geography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economyGeography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economy

Identified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonationIdentified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonation

Copied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithmsCopied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithms

Body Weekly - July 2013 Archives


Same beat set to different tunes changes walkers' pace (7/31/2013)

Personal tastes in music have little to do with how we keep time to a tune while walking, according to research published July 10 by Marc Leman and colleagues from Ghent University, Belgium in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. ...> Full Article


Don't worry, be healthy (7/31/2013)

People with cheerful temperaments are significantly less likely to suffer a coronary event such as a heart attack or sudden cardiac death, new Johns Hopkins research suggests. ...> Full Article


Going through the motions improves dance performance (7/31/2013)

Dance marking -- loosely practicing a ballet routine by "going through the motions" -- may improve the quality of dance performance by reducing the mental strain needed to perfect the movements, according to new research published in Psychological Science. ...> Full Article


Estée Lauder clinical trial finds link between sleep deprivation and skin aging (7/31/2013)

Estée Lauder clinical trial finds link between sleep deprivation and skin agingIn a first-of-its-kind clinical trial, physician-scientists at University Hospitals Case Medical Center found that sleep quality impacts skin function and aging. The recently completed study, commissioned by Estée Lauder, demonstrated that poor sleepers had increased signs of skin aging and slower recovery from a variety of environmental stressors, such as disruption of the skin barrier or ultraviolet radiation. Poor sleepers also had worse assessment of their own skin and facial appearance. ...> Full Article


Antioxidants -- too much of a good thing? (7/30/2013)

In older men, a natural antioxidant compound found in red grapes and other plants -- called resveratrol -- blocks many of the cardiovascular benefits of exercise, according to research published July 22, 2013 in The Journal of Physiology. ...> Full Article


Optimists better at regulating stress (7/30/2013)

Optimists better at regulating stressIt's no surprise that those who tend to see a rose's blooms before its thorns are also better at handling stress. But science has failed to reliably associate optimism with individuals' biological stress response -- until now. ...> Full Article


Sleepless nights can turn lovers into fighters (7/30/2013)

Relationship problems can keep us awake at night. But new research from UC Berkeley suggests that sleepless nights also can worsen lovers' fights. ...> Full Article


Rate of aging may be determined in the womb and linked to birthweight, study reveals (7/29/2013)

Scientists have found that key metabolites in blood -- chemical 'fingerprints' left behind as a result of early molecular changes before birth or in infancy -- could provide clues to a person's long-term overall health and rate of aging in later life. ...> Full Article


Women working shifts are at greater risk of miscarriage, menstrual disruption and subfertility (7/28/2013)

Shift work, which encourages sleep deprivation and patterns of activity outside the circadian rhythm, has been associated with a greater risk of ill health and loss of well-being in some studies. However, little is known about the effects of shift work on reproductive health and fertility. A study reported today at the annual meeting of ESHRE, by Dr Linden Stocker from the University of Southampton, UK, indicates that working shift patterns is associated with an increased risk of menstrual disruption and subfertility. ...> Full Article


Double-barreled attack on obesity in no way a no-brainer (7/27/2013)

Double-barreled attack on obesity in no way a no-brainerIn the constant cross talk between our brain and our gut, two gut hormones are already known to tell the brain when we have had enough to eat. New research from Sydney's Garvan Institute of Medical Research suggests that boosting levels of these hormones simultaneously may be an effective new weapon in the fight against obesity. While the double-barreled approach may seem like a no-brainer, the strongly enhanced effect seen was by no means inevitable. ...> Full Article


Melody modulates choir members' heart rate (7/26/2013)

When people sing in a choir their heart beats are synchronised, so that the pulse of choir members tends to increase and decrease in unison. This has been shown by a study researchers from the Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg that examined the health effects for choir members. The study is published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Neuroscience. ...> Full Article


Unattractive people more likely to be bullied at work, new Notre Dame study shows (7/26/2013)

It's common knowledge that high school can be a cruel environment where attractive students are considered "popular," and unattractive kids often get bullied. And, while that type of petty behavior is expected to vanish with adulthood, new research proves it does not. Colleagues can be just as immature as classmates. ...> Full Article


Research leads to successful restoration of hearing and balance (7/25/2013)

A research project at Kansas State University has the potential to treat human deafness and loss of balance. ...> Full Article


Inflammation links social adversity and diabetes (7/25/2013)

Diabetes is strongly associated with socioeconomic status: Low income, low education, and low occupational status are all linked to a higher risk for diabetes. Trying to understand the mechanisms underlying the association, Silvia Stringhini from the Institute for Social and Preventive Medicine in Lausanne, Switzerland and colleagues report in this week's PLOS Medicine that a substantial part of it appears to be attributable to chronic inflammation. ...> Full Article


Weekly yoga class yields similar lower back pain relief as 2 classes (7/25/2013)

Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center have found that a weekly yoga class provided similar lower back pain relief and reduced the need for pain medication as twice weekly classes in lower income minority patients. ...> Full Article


Researchers find new clue to cause of human narcolepsy (7/24/2013)

UCLA researchers have found that an excess number of brain cells that produce the chemical histamine may cause the loss of other cells that produce hypocretin, the neuropeptide that keeps us awake, elevates mood and alertness, and, by their absence, explains the sleepiness of narcolepsy. ...> Full Article


People's diets show a sugar-fat seesaw (7/23/2013)

New research review shows why people find it hard to follow nutrition guidelines to cut their fat and sugars intake at the same time -- a phenomenon known as the sugar-fat seesaw. ...> Full Article


What are fructooliogosaccharides and how do they provide health benefits? (7/23/2013)

A new presentation at the 2013 Institute of Food Technologists Annual Meeting & Expo in Chicago focused on the health benefits of short-chain fructooliogosaccharides, which are low-calorie, non-digestible carbohydrates that can improve food taste and texture while aiding immunity, bone health and the growth and balance of important bacteria in the digestive track. ...> Full Article


Placental cells may prevent viruses from passing from mother to baby (7/22/2013)

Cells of the placenta may have a unique ability to prevent viruses from crossing from an expectant mother to her growing baby and can transfer that trait to other kinds of cells, according to researchers at Magee-Womens Research Institute and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Their findings, published in the early online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences could point to new approaches to combat viral infections. ...> Full Article


Exercise-induced improvements in glycemic control and type 2 diabetes (7/21/2013)

Exercise-induced improvements in glycemic control are dependent on the pre-training glycemic level, and although moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can improve glycemic control, individuals with ambient hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) are more likely to be nonresponders, according to a research letter by Thomas P. J. Solomon, Ph.D. of the Centre of Inflammation and Metabolism, Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues. ...> Full Article


Controlling blood pressure, cholesterol may significantly cut heart disease risk (7/20/2013)

Controlling both your high blood pressure and high cholesterol may cut your risk for heart disease by half or more. Fewer than one in three patients had both conditions under control, in a national data review. Minorities, older people and those with diabetes may benefit most from managing both conditions. ...> Full Article


Inactivation of taste genes causes male sterility (7/19/2013)

Scientists from the Monell Center report the surprising finding that two proteins involved in oral taste detection also play a crucial role in sperm development. In addition, the human form of one protein is blocked by the commonly prescribed lipid-lowering drug clofibrate, perhaps linking this and related compounds to the rising incidence of human infertility. ...> Full Article


Hearing loss from loud blasts may be treatable, researchers say (7/18/2013)

Long-term hearing loss from loud explosions, such as blasts from roadside bombs, may not be as irreversible as previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. ...> Full Article


Scientists show how DHA resolves inflammation (7/17/2013)

Chronic inflammation is a major factor in problems from arthritis to cardiovascular disease, and DHA is known to help. New research in The FASEB Journal, explains why DHA is important in reducing inflammation, and provides an important lead to finding new drugs that will help bring people back to optimal health. Researchers found that macrophages use DHA to produce "maresins," which are the "switch" that turns inflammation off and switches on resolution. ...> Full Article


Can watching an avatar translate to real-life weight loss? (7/16/2013)

Can watching an avatar translate to real-life weight loss?An estimated two-thirds of all Americans are overweight or obese and many find it difficult to lose weight and keep it off. They've tried fad diets, exercise programs, diet pills and other methods but the battle continues. Now, a new study suggests that watching an avatar model weight-loss behavior in a virtual community might help some women shed pounds in the real world. ...> Full Article


Radiation from airport scanners -- how much dose we get (7/15/2013)

A new report by an independent task force commissioned by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, has found that people absorb less radiation from airport X-ray backscatter scanner than they do while standing in line waiting for the scan itself. ...> Full Article


Stress: It should never be ignored! (7/15/2013)

Work pressure, tension at home, financial difficulties... the list of causes of stress grows longer every day. There have been several studies in the past showing that stress can have negative effects on health (cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, high blood pressure and more). ...> Full Article


Could a diet high in fish and flax help prevent broken hips? (7/14/2013)

Higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the blood may reduce the risk for hip fractures in postmenopausal women, recent research suggests. ...> Full Article


Why is pulmonary hypertension at high altitude so common and dangerous? (7/14/2013)

Why is pulmonary hypertension at high altitude so common and dangerous?Everyone who climbs to high altitude will develop pulmonary hypertension, a temporary constriction of blood vessels that results in increasing strain on the right heart. It is a normal adaptive mechanism but if exaggerated can have serious consequences, resulting in life-threatening disorders and remodeling of the pulmonary circulation. ...> Full Article


People's perception of the effect of stress on their health is linked to risk of heart attacks (7/13/2013)

People who believe that stress is having an adverse impact on their health are probably right, because they have an increased risk of suffering a heart attack, according to new research published in the European Heart Journal. The latest results from the UK's Whitehall II study found that people who believe stress is affecting their health "a lot or extremely" had double the risk of a heart attack compared to people who didn't believe stress was having a significant effect on their health. ...> Full Article


Influenza infection increases likelihood of bacterial pneumonia 100-fold, U-Michigan-led study finds (7/12/2013)

It's been known for more than two centuries that pneumonia cases increase during flu epidemics. ...> Full Article


Calcium and vitamin D help hormones help bones (7/11/2013)

Should women take calcium and vitamin D supplements after menopause for bone health? Recommendations conflict, and opinions are strong. But now, an analysis from the major Women's Health Initiative trial throws weight on the supplement side -- at least for women taking hormones after menopause. The analysis was published online today in Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society. ...> Full Article


Cutlery: Do size, weight, shape and color matter? (7/10/2013)

Cutlery: Do size, weight, shape and color matter?The appearance of cutlery can affect perception of a food's taste, reports BioMed Central's open access journal Flavour. Food tastes saltier when eaten from a knife, and denser and more expensive from a light plastic spoon. Taste was also affected by the color of the cutlery. ...> Full Article


Cola and honey: Exploring food riddles in rhythm disturbances (7/9/2013)

Drinking excessive amounts of cola and eating honey made from the pollen of Rhododendrons can cause unusual syncope (fainting) and symptoms of arrhythmia, report two case studies presented as abstracts at the EHRA EUROPACE 2013 meeting, in Athens 23 to 26 June. ...> Full Article


Feeling stressed? (7/8/2013)

Feeling stressed?Scientists have shown that reaching out to other people during a stressful event is an effective way to improve your mood, and researchers at Concordia University suggest that the hormone oxytocin may help you accomplish just that. ...> Full Article


One man's tall is another man's small (7/7/2013)

One man's tall is another man's smallPortions -- such as 8, 12 or 16 ounces -- are given different labels -- small, medium or large -- at different restaurants. However, how a portion is described size-wise impacts how much we eat and how much we're willing to pay for our food, reports a new study conducted by David Just and Brian Wansink both Professors at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. ...> Full Article


Total amount of exercise important, not frequency, research shows (7/6/2013)

Queen's study says getting at least 150 minutes of exercise per week is paramount but choosing how to schedule the exercise is not. ...> Full Article


Does your salad know what time it is? (7/5/2013)

Does your salad know what time it is?Biologists at Rice University and the University of California at Davis have found there may be potential health benefits to storing fresh produce under day-night cycles of light. In a new study this week in Current Biology, researchers used lighting to alter the circadian rhythms of cabbage, lettuce, spinach, zucchini, carrots, sweet potatoes and blueberries. The scientists showed how manipulation of circadian rhythms caused cabbage to produce more phytochemicals, including antioxidants. ...> Full Article


Brandeis scientist invents anti-cholesterol process (7/4/2013)

Senior Brandeis research scientist Daniel Perlman has discovered a way to make phytosterol molecules from plants dispersible in beverages and foods that are consumed by humans, potentially opening the way to dramatic reductions in human cholesterol levels.The ability of phytosterols to reduce cholesterol levels in animals has been recognized since the 1950s, but practical application of this knowledge has been difficult because phytosterols are not naturally water-soluble, and they are only poorly soluble in fatty substances. ...> Full Article


Hormonal therapy for transsexualism safe and effective (7/3/2013)

Hormonal therapy for transsexual patients is safe and effective, a multicenter European study indicates. The results will be presented Saturday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco. ...> Full Article


Scientists find new biomarker to measure sugar consumption (7/2/2013)

Scientists find new biomarker to measure sugar consumptionScientists at the University of Alaska Fairbanks identified a new tool that can dramatically improve the notoriously inaccurate surveys of what and how much an individual eats and drinks. Their research is published in the June 2013 issue of the Journal of Nutrition. ...> Full Article


Timing of calcium and vitamin D supplementation may affect how bone adapts to exercise (7/2/2013)

Taking calcium and vitamin D before exercise may influence how bones adapt to exercise, according to a new study. The results will be presented on Tuesday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco. ...> Full Article


Why is it easier to lose 2-4 pounds rather than 3 pounds? (7/1/2013)

Consumers are more likely to pursue goals when they are ambitious yet flexible, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research. ...> Full Article


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Vitamin supplement successfully prevents noise-induced hearing loss



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